Helping Families Flourish

 
 

Chicago Trustee Collaboratory BLOG

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  • September 29, 2014 7:00 PM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)

    There are many ways a trust protector can help families flourish.   The Chicago Trustee Collaboratory came up with various different ones when it recently addressed the subject of Collaboration with Trust Protectors.


    The Collaboratory added insights to the list of functions a trust protector can provide:

    • A corrective,
    • Another voice of prudence,
    • An over-seer of the trust,
    • The foil,
    • A third party neutral,
    • A thoughtful provocateur,  
    • A check and balance, or
    • A facilitator to allow all voices to be heard.

    The Collaboratory also considered specialized trust protector roles, such as:

    • Legacy protector,
    • The receiver and reviewer of the trustee’s accountings, and
    • A champion of quality of life.

    One issue raised as to the collaboration with trust protectors is the payment of fees of the professional trust protector by person who he may be called to monitor, namely, the trustee.   This potential conflict raises the importance of advance planning, maintaining boundaries and other checks and balances.


    For a full copy of the Collaboratory’s report, click here.

    For other articles by the Collaboratory, visit our In the Media page. 

  • July 01, 2014 4:00 PM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)

    In this video, the Chicago Trustee Collaboratory addresses a few key issues around the benefits of a triangle family system. 


    The Collaboratory’s insights include:

    • This is NOT the same as the concept of triangulation.
    • This recognizes the trustee as spark-plug to help ignite good things in the family.
    • Goal of the trustee: to bring the beneficiary from dependence to interdependence to independence.
    • Important to accept and work with the beneficiaries from where they are at.

      This is one of the points raised by Kathy Wiseman in Chapter 2 of "Trustworthy" - and one of 10 key points the Collaboratory identifies in the book written by her and Hartley Goldstone.

      View the video  here.
    • May 16, 2014 7:32 AM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)
      In this video, the Chicago Trustee Collaboratory addresses a few key issues around the concept of thinking of the family as an integrated emotional unit.

      The Collaboratory’s insights include:
      • This is a “must” concept to be accessed as soon as possible.
      • It helps the family work together and do what what’s best.
      • Helps those working with the family to understand their non-rational reactions.
      • Honors alignment over agreement in governance.
      • Communication and acceptance is key. Consider using thinking circles.
      This is one of the points raised by Kathy Wiseman in Chapter 2 of "Trustworthy" - and one of 10 key points the Collaboratory identifies in the book.

      View the video from the Collaboratory's Scoop.it page here.
    • May 13, 2014 10:45 AM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)
      Follow this 12 point list of do's and don'ts to bolster the trust you want to develop and earn.   

      The list is represents the combined wisdom of two top experts plus the other members of the Chicago Trustee Collaboratory in a recent set of meetings. 

      Get the list and other pointers here.  
    • March 31, 2014 8:56 PM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)

      In this video, members of the Chicago Trustee Collaboratory address a few key issues around the opportunity of using a trust to both educate the next generation and promote their maturity.


      This is one of the points raised by Kathy Wiseman in Chapter 2 of "Trustworthy"  - and one of 10 key points the Collaboratory identifies in the book.


      The Collaboratory’s insights include:

      • Using this opportunity well is key to helping the family flourish.
      •  The family should be accepted and worked with from wherever they are at. 
      • The rule of thumb of 3 parts qualitative to 1 quantitative applies. 
      • Work with meaning, context and alignment
    • January 05, 2014 8:50 PM | Daniel P. Felix (Administrator)
      It's about loyalty, trust and common sense.

      Read the details on the latest post from the Collaboratory.   We guide you through the maze of information on the subject.
    • December 08, 2013 9:36 AM | Deleted user
      Members of the group gathered to discuss the book "Trustworthy" and provide their insight and comments:


    • December 02, 2013 1:16 AM | Deleted user
      Chicago Trustee Collaboratory                        THINKINGCIRCLE

       

      The thinking circle

      making, apparently a Quaker wisdom tradition.   Highly structured and respectful, the

      thinking circle allows for 

      • individuals to go deeper in their thinking, 

      • emotions to be expressed and serve as an appropriate guide, 

      • all individuals to participate, 

      • and, sometimes, group consensus!

      The thinking circle can be used in any group: client, professional, class, or family.   It may

      be self‐facilitated or facilitated by a non‐participant.  The essential methodology

      involves these rules:

      1. Participants sit around a table or otherwise in a circle.  The speaking opportunity

      passes in sequence from one person to the next around the circle.

      2. If it’s not your turn, you may not speak.  For your turn, you may speak or pass.

      3. If you pass on one round, you may still speak on later rounds.

      4. For your turn, you can choose to do any one or more of the following:

      a. state your own position, including how you may agree or disagree with

      what someone else said.

      b. ask or answer questions, or 

      c. make and respond to requests.   

      5. Participants are invited to listen deeply to the other speakers.   Sometimes the

      one lone voice is the most important.

      6. Redundant messages and disrespect are generally discouraged.

      7. Continue around the circle as many times as it takes until everyone has passed,

      or by limitation of time, rounds, consensus or leadership.

                                                                   1

       Thanks to HARTLEY GOLDSTONE for introducing his version of the Thinking Circle through the Rendezvous

      Collaboration of the Purposeful Planning Institute.

      © The Chicago Trustee Collaboratory 2013.   May be used non‐commercially with attribution.   All other rights

      reserved.
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